1950s Home Management Book ... page 418




"Most people will agree that some sort of plan is essential in running a home, but let if first be made clear that household routine is a very individual matter, and it is impossible to lay down hard and fast rules. However, as all homemakers have to struggle with the problem, let us see if some useful guidance cane be given which will help every household to work out its own salvation".


What Has To Be Done


" The next step is to decide what has to be done to keep the household happy, healthy and comfortable. The first essential is good feeding, and this is a task needing knowledge skill and ingenuity. It includes planning, shopping and the preparation if interesting well-balanced meals, plus serving, washing up and clearing away day after day for seven days a week.


Next to feeding comes clothing, for if the supply of clean, tidy clothes runs out the members of the family will find themselves in dire straits indeed. Household linen and soft furnishings must be included in this too and, whether the laundry is done at home or sent out, time must be allowed for care and attention to clothing, and making, mending and renovation."




"Third on the list is the care and cleaning of the home, from daily attention and thorough cleaning to special cleaning in all parts of the home, decoration, renovation and repair"




"last but by no means least, the housewife must find time for her own relaxation and recreation and to take an understanding interest in the life and pursuits of her family. The routine must be adaptable, or family difficulties will arise because the mother has worn herself out trying to keep to a strict plan and has no energy left to deal with personal problems or to devote to entertaining"




" We now have to fit all of this into a workable plan".




This is from a two book series called "Newnes Home Management". My mum got them at a book sale or garage sale for virtually nothing and I love them. They have everything from cooking to budgeting. There is even a section entitled 'housework for the figure' in which you can keep a shapely body by stretching a little further when you dust ! LOL


Household management has been on my mind as I work through my management binder. I have noticed that bloggers have been discussing the pros and cons of Flylady ( http://www.flylady.net/) or GTD ( Getting Things Done - book by David Allen) What is the best way to manage a household ? Do you subscribe to any one method ? Wash on Monday, iron on Tuesday like the old days ? Do you spend the weekends doing housework when you should be out there 'living' ?


I will post more on the 1950s method of 'keeping house'. Who knows, we might learn something !

2 comments:

Marsha said...

My method adheres more to the old "wash on Monday" routines, although not organized quite that way. When I'm working outside the home (as I am now) my daily lists of tasks are shorter and rely more on weekend time, but longer if I'm not working for pay. Either way, I use a simple weekday calendar and type in my routines with bullet points- I usually do a load of laundry each on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from wash to dry to put away, sweeping/carpet sweeping and watering plants is Tuesday while dusting and cleaning the bath is Thursday. Every day bullets are pet care(cat boxes, etc.), dishes, and so on. Weekly stuff like garbage day is handled, too, as is seasonal things like washing curtains and window cleaning or cupboard cleaning. It's a basic system but it works for us. The house stays tidy and it's flexible enough for us to respond to changes in the schedule while not spending crazy amounts of time on cleaning. It helps that we only have one bathroom (it's more usual where I live to have a minimum of three, sometimes five or six!) and I'm always on clutter patrol.

I have to confess that I'm jealous of those books! I adore old housewifery manuals...

louise said...

I am a flylady fan, her system has really helped me get on top of things. I don't follow it rigidly but I did at first, I find it really practical, I've also tried GTD for work, with some success but it does require a lot of committment.